Cornwall Mining & Thorncroft Manor

When I write historical romance, I take the time to research. All of my books are carefully laced with background material regarding the setting and era in which my characters lived.  Thorncroft Manor was no different.  The majority of my research in this novel related to the city of Pendeen and the Cornish mines along the coast of Cornwall, England. Most of the facts about Cornish mining were taken from the websites linked below.  If you are interested in learning more, here is an opportunity to read about the real miners who toiled in the depths of the earth. Life from the past always fascinates me, no matter what the subject. Research helps stories come alive when you travel back in time to how people lived, worked, and loved in centuries past. “In 1839, 7,000 children were employed in Cornish tin mines.  Until the age of 12, young boys worked Read More

My Inspiration for Lady Charlotte

I had a great time writing Lady Charlotte, which is a tit-for-tat relationship between Albert Beckett and Charlotte Rutherford.  Cedric, Charlotte’s cousin, thinks her behavior is an embarrassment to the extended family and sets out on a bid to reform her ways. He chooses Albert Beckett to take on that task, who you will soon find out spouts an awful lot about what constitutes good society. So, where did I get all this stuffy fluff about behavior?  It’s from a book that I’ve used quite a bit in research entitled, The Habits of Good Society: A Handbook for Ladies and Gentleman written by an Unknown Author in 1872. I wrote a review of the book on Amazon that will give you an idea of its contents: When writing, I try to be as accurate as possible regarding the times. However, this book goes far beyond what I would term a typical Read More

Building a Story Around History

My life would be so much easier if I just wrote in the twenty-first century where I’m familiar with everything around me.  I can see why contemporary authors often pound out book after book of modern love stories.  Unless they are focused on some particular subject, research is pretty much quick and easy. I’m sure in some cases, it’s not needed.  The only book I’ve been lucky enough to write with little effort is my one contemporary romance. However, I apparently love to torture myself by picking difficult subject matter.  Lady Grace is no exception.  Set during World War I in England from 1914-1919, I’ve been spending hours researching everything from aspirin to Belgian refugees in order to place this story in a believable setting.  Research teaches me (a person who once hated history), and I am often fascinated about what I learn. As I finish the first draft (yes, Read More