My Visit to Lyme Park (fictionally known as Mr. Darcy’s Pemberley)

My visit to Lyme Park while visiting Manchester UK this October was for the purpose of taking my book, Blythe Court, and standing in front of the estate and snapping a picture. Lyme Park is on the cover, as well as “The Cage” on a hill in the background. Of course, most of my readers are probably more interested in the fact that Lyme Park was Mr. Darcy’s Pemberley in Pride & Prejudice with Colin Firth. Getting to Lyme Park is fairly easy coming from Manchester.  I took a train from Piccadilly Station to Disley, which took approximately 36 minutes. When I exited, there is a steep climb up to the roadway. The directions I received from the National Trust was to turn left and walk a half-mile.  There is a sidewalk the entire way but the road is extremely busy with cars and trucks whizzing by your side only a Read More

My Visit to Elizabeth Gaskell’s Home in Manchester

Today I had a wonderful and inspirational experience visiting the home of Elizabeth Gaskell in Manchester, UK, at 84 Plymouth Grove. Her most memorable works were Cranford (1851-53), North & South (1854-55), and Wives & Daughters (1865). She also authored many other works over the years such as short stories and novellas. After arriving at the home, I was greeted by informative volunteers placed in each of the rooms ready to give visitors the background on the house and the fascinating lives of its former occupants.  The home itself is actually Georgian in design, but the interior, of course, in the mid-1800s was Victorian. Elizabeth and her husband William moved into the home in 1850 (it was built in 1838). The home has welcomed many to its doors, including Charlotte Bronte and Beatrice Potter,  The narrator told us that the doorbell knob had been pulled by others, including Harriet Beecher Read More

Dancing (1872 Style)

A lady – beautiful word! — is a delicate creature, one who should be reverenced and delicately treated. It is therefore unpardonable to rush about in a quadrille, to catch hold of the lady’s hand as if she were a door-handle, or to drag her furiously across the room, as if you were Bluebeard…”  (The Habits of Good Society: By Unknown Author, originally published 1872. Copyright 2012 Forgotten Books). Recently on my author Facebook page, I’ve been posting videos of period dramas with romantic scenes of waltzes.  Some of my favorites are from The Young Victoria, War & Peace (2016), Cinderella, and Crimson Peak.  They look so romantic with women in gorgeous gowns being swung around the room by handsome men. According to The Habits of Good Society, there were rules to be followed if you were considered to be an “accomplished” individual on the dance floor.  The introduction above Read More

The English Victorian Wedding – 1872 Style

I am back to poking around one of my favorite books, “The Habits of Good Society: A Handbook for Ladies and Gentlemen,”  available on Amazon in print form.  Tucked on page 316 is Chapter XV. Marriage.  It begins with this quote: At a time when our feelings are or ought to be most susceptible, when the happiness or misery of a condition in which there is no medium begins, we are surrounded with forms and etiquettes which rise before the unwary like spectres, and which even the most rigid ceremonialists regard with a sort of dread.” Here is how courtship, engagement, and the wedding process is described by the anonymous author of this fascinating peek into 1871 life. First, an offer of marriage must be made, and even in 1871 it is the custom that the lady surrenders to the will of her parents.  They must approve of the match, Read More

The Truth Behind Facebook Pages

Recently, I boosted one of my posts by paying Facebook $20. Most authors make Facebook pages to gain and interact with readers. At the present time, I have 1,828 likes on my page.  How many people see what I post?  Hardly no one, unless I pay.  Here is a recent sampling of the number of people I’ve reached in the past few days: 88 People – Posted a link to my entertainment blog on a movie I recently reviewed. 6 people – Made a two sentence comment about someone who read The Price of Passion. 44 people – Gave my best selling statistics on Amazon UK for Dark Persuasion 5 people – I wrote three sentences complaining about how many people I can reach in my audience when I post. (I’m feeling censored – 5 out of 1,828 know how I feel.) If I want anyone to read what I Read More

Emma the Movie (1996) vs. Emma (ITV 1996) vs. Emma the BBC Series (2009)

Kernel Tossing – Movie 5 – Series 4 – ITV 3 So this should be an interesting post. I just finished completely watching the 2009 BBC Emma, after only having seen portions. I’… Source: Emma the Movie (1996) vs. Emma (ITV 1996) vs. Emma the BBC Series (2009) Read my review on Popcorn Entertainment about the three adaptations of Emma.  Do you have a favorite? Read More

Victorian Cleanliness 1872 Style (Part 2)

“But the man who throws his clothes about the room, a boot in one corner, a cravat in another, and his brushes anywhere, is not a man of good habits. The spirit of order should extend to everything about him.” All quotes are taken from “The Habits of Good Society: A handbook for Ladies and Gentlemen.” If only the writer could see my nails. Broken, uneven, and badly needing my cuticles cut. I exhibit poor habits. Of course, I need to work and am not of the upper crust in England either, so what does it matter that I type all day and break them left and right?  Having clean and long nails was the mark of gentility because it stated you were rich enough that you didn’t have to work. Victorians were told to pay strict attention to the condition of their nails. They should be buffed with soap Read More

Victorian Cleanliness 1872 Style (Part I)

“In the beginning of the present century (19th), it was thought proper for a gentleman to change his undergarment three times a day, and the washing bill of a beau comprised seventy shirts, thirty cravats, and pocket handkerchiefs à discretion.” (The Habits of Good Society 1872) This chapter has been of particular interest to me mostly because of the stories I’ve read about the poor hygiene in centuries past. However, when it came to the Regency and Victorian era, the upper class deemed it important as a sign of good character. Not only cleanliness was a duty for the sake of health and being agreeable to one’s neighbor, but it also went hand-in-hand with obeying the scriptures as a means of exemplifying purity. Poor personal habits by an individual who neglected his body was a sure sign of weak character. The Victorians in 1872, however, thought Beau Brummell’s idea of Read More

KU Scammers on Amazon – What’s Going On? Repost from The Passive Voice

Dear Readers, The link to this article is posted as a means of reader education on my part.  What you read may shock you, but if you are part of Kindle Unlimited it’s important for you to know how your downloads result in paid earnings to authors. Each time you download one of Nora Covington’s exclusive books, I am only paid up until the last page that syncs on your Kindle. Because of this, many scammers are infiltrating Kindle Unlimited posting books by deceptive means to get you to click to the last page. To understand how this works, I encourage you to read and be informed. As much as I love writing and providing you with stories from my heart, it’s a jungle out there in eBook land. At times, it becomes discouraging when people who are not playing fair make the most money by cheating and deception. From Read More